Improving Your Shot - Photography Tips

Improving Your Shot - Photography Tips

Jul 16, 2012|Photography| by administrator

With all the new technology available, cameras have become much easier to use. Taking a picture has become a much simpler process that no longer threatens to blow up in your face whenever you wish to use the flash. But if it is so easy, then why don’t all of our pictures come out perfect? Unfortunately, we haven’t found the technology yet to give a camera a mind of its own, and taking a good picture involves the person just as much as the camera in his or her hands. Some people would even say the technology doesn’t matter, whether it is a small disposable camera or a high-tech professional one. It all depends on the techniques the person behind the lens employs. Don’t worry, you do not need to be a rocket scientist to improve the quality of your pictures. Here are a few easy tips to get you started.

1.      The rule of thirds Most people have the habit of placing the subject in the center of the photograph. This can become dull and boring, so try the rule of thirds. Break up your picture into thirds and try placing the object in a different plane.

[caption id="attachment_2934" align="aligncenter" ] Photo by Todd Gustafson, Gustafson Photo Safari[/caption]

2.      P.O.V. Another way to shake up your typical picture is to try a different point of view. Most people take pictures standing up and simply point the camera in the direction they choose. Try getting on level with the subject, even if that means getting on the ground. Along the same line, try getting up and personal with your subject too, either by using the zoom function or by changing your position if the situation allows it. Surrounding space can cause your picture to lose its focal point. Details are also much clearer with a closer shot.

[caption id="attachment_2935" align="aligncenter" width="550px"] Photo by Todd Gustafson, Gustafson Photo Safari[/caption]

3.      Flash People tend to overuse the flash function on the camera. Try a more natural approach, finding light in poorly lit areas instead of washing out the subjects and blacking out the background with a flash. Conversely, try using the flash on bright sunny days to eliminate unwanted shadows in the picture.

[caption id="attachment_2936" align="aligncenter" width="550"] Photo by Todd Gustafson, Gustafson Photo Safari[/caption]

4.      Focus These tips are all swell and dandy, but if the picture comes out blurry, then they go to waste, so don’t forget to focus your camera. On a regular point-and-shoot digital camera this is typically done by pressing the shutter release halfway down first.

[caption id="attachment_2941" align="aligncenter" width="550"] Photo by Todd Gustafson, Gustafson Photo Safari[/caption]

5.       Patience These tips combine the usage of both the camera and your own skills, but the key to a good picture falls solely on you. And that key is patience. Don’t expect for your first shot to come out perfect, and don’t be easily satisfied once you have a shot you like. When you come across a scene, stay for a while and take a lot of pictures. The difference between a good picture and a spectacular one depends on it.

[caption id="attachment_2944" align="aligncenter" width="550"] Photo by Todd Gustafson, Gustafson Photo Safari[/caption]

Most importantly, you should know you don’t need to be a professional photographer to take a good picture, and everyone has his or her own style. What tips would you give someone who wants to improve their pictures? Leave a comment and let us know.

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